Monthly Archives February 2019

In the course of our research for clients, we come across emerging technologies, new materials, new chemistries, growing markets, changing regulatory landscapes, innovative business models, and much more. Every other Friday, we pick five articles, videos, or podcasts that we found interesting and send them your way.

MATERIALS SCIENCE | POLYMERS | ENVIRONMENT

Scaling up Nodax, a Landfill and Waterway-Biodegradable, Biobased Plastic

Nodax PHA—a bioplastic produced by bacterial cultures grown with canola oil—is compostable, biodegradable in marine environments, biocompatible, and customizable for a variety of applications. Due to a partnership between Danimer Scientific (developers of Nodax) and Nestle, we could soon see Nodax on store shelves and in our homes. [LAB CONSCIOUS]

BIOLOGY

The Extraordinary Life and Death of the World’s Oldest Known Spider

A fascinating look at the life of an Australian trapdoor spider with details provided by the zoologists who studied her for her entire life. [WASHINGTON POST]

STRATEGY

Bias Busters: Pruning Projects Proactively

A quick look at the reasons why executives hold on to under-performing assets and projects, and some tips to help determine which to keep and which to let go. [MCKINSEY]

3D PRINTING | SPACE

The Future of In-Space Manufacturing

Everything needed for a trip to space, including food, tools, and all supplies for any contingency, have to be made on Earth. This makes solar system exploration a costly endeavor, but space-based 3D printers will soon make loading rockets with supplies and spare parts a thing of the past. [COSMOS]

TECHNOLOGY

I Cut the ‘Big Five’ Tech Giants From My Life. It Was Hell.

A fascinating look at what happened when one woman decided to completely remove Facebook, Microsoft, Apple, Google, and Amazon from her life. If you are concerned about the reach and influence of Big Tech in your life . . . well . . . it’s worse than you think. [GIZMODO]

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In the course of our research for clients, we come across emerging technologies, new materials, new chemistries, growing markets, changing regulatory landscapes, innovative business models, and much more. Every other Friday, we pick five articles, videos, or podcasts that we found interesting and send them your way.

MICROMACHINES | VIDEO

Metal-Free Micromotor Could Clean Waste Water

Micromachines can propel themselves through solutions by reacting with fuel in their environment. But most of these machines have relied on ultraviolet light and expensive noble metals like gold and platinum to drive the reactions. Now, a team led by researchers from the University of Chemistry and Technology, Prague have made a simple, metal-free micromotor that operates under visible light. This short video shows them in action. [C&EN]

CELLULAR AGRICULTURE | BIOLOGY

Here’s Everything You Need to Know to Grow Your Own Hamburgers

This in-depth article breaks down the very-involved process of instructing cells from live organisms to grow into edible muscle, outside that organism. Follow these steps, and after much trial and error, you can be well on your way to eating your own cultured meat. [MASSIVE SCIENCE]

INNOVATION | PODCAST

How Big Companies Can Innovate Like Small Startups

In his new book, Creative Construction: The DNA of Sustained Innovation, Harvard business administration professor Gary Pisano outlines the three factors that large firms must develop to foster innovation. [WHARTON]

DISRUPTION | AUTONOMOUS VEHICLES

Distraction or Disruption? Autonomous Trucks Gain Ground in US Logistics

In the first of a series of articles detailing trends in near future disruptive technologies, this article focuses on autonomous trucks, their likely development, expected cost-saving boost for US retailers, and their impact on the deeply traditional trucking industry. [MCKINSEY]

MOBILITY | AUTONOMOUS VEHICLES | FUTURE

How Generation Alpha Will Experience Mobility

A quick look at one possible mobility future. It’s a little pie-in-the-sky but an interesting take on how today’s children may get around as they move into their teen years and beyond. [2025AD]

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