Monthly Archives August 2019

In the course of our research for clients, we come across emerging technologies, new materials, new chemistries, growing markets, changing regulatory landscapes, innovative business models, and much more. Every other Friday, we pick five articles, videos, or podcasts that we found interesting and send them your way.

ASTROPHYSICS

A Flashing Mystery is Unfolding at the Center of the Milky Way

At the heart of our galaxy lies a black hole with some four million times the mass of the sun. Known as Sagittarius A* (which is pronounced “Sagittarius A star”), it creates a tumultuous environment, whipping stars around at millions of miles per hour and shredding any asteroids that come close with the force of its gravity. The beast now appears to be acting even more aggressively than usual, flashing twice as brightly as astrophysicists have ever seen before. [POPULAR SCIENCE]

CHEMISTRY | BIOLOGY

Did Biology Begin with Tiny Bubbles?

New research suggests that tiny, heated, gas-filled bubbles in hydrothermal rocks could have kick-started life’s emergence on prebiotic Earth. Simulation experiments suggest that bubbles could enrich prebiotic molecules and enable six essential processes that could eventually give rise to life, adding weight to the idea that conditions at hydrothermal vents were ideal for life to first form. [ROYAL SOCIETY]

INNOVATION

Telling a Good Innovation Story

Partners at McKinsey spent three years researching how people frame their innovation stories to create differentiation and attract attention. After analyzing more than 1000 “innovation stories,” they extracted three lessons for senior managers and entrepreneurs on what makes a compelling an emotional story. [MCKINSEY]

SEMICONDUCTORS | ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE

Cerebras Systems Unveils a Record 1.2 Trillion Transistor Chip for AI

A California based startup, Cerebras Systems, this week revealed the largest processor ever built, with 400,000 cores on a single chip. Why build bigger when the trend over the past decades has been smaller and smaller? Because it’s ideal for AI applications where it dramatically speeds training time. [VENTURE BEAT]

INNOVATION

Top Emerging Technologies 2019

Leading technology experts from around the globe evaluated dozens of proposals to come up with this list of emerging technologies poised to shake up the world. Some of them will surprise you. [WORLD ECONOMIC FORUM]

Read More

In the course of our research for clients, we come across emerging technologies, new materials, new chemistries, growing markets, changing regulatory landscapes, innovative business models, and much more. Every other Friday, we pick five articles, videos, or podcasts that we found interesting and send them your way.

SPACECRAFT | PROPULSION

Lightsail 2 Spacecraft Succeeds in Flying on Sunlight Alone

Lightsail 2 is the first spacecraft propelled by nothing but sunlight. The crowdfunded vehicle reached orbit with traditional thrusters but raised that orbit two kilometers using only the force of photons. [TECH CRUNCH]

CLIMATE | FOOD

Using CO2 and Renewable Energy to Make Food Out of Thin-air

olein is a single-celled protein made with solar energy, CO2 extracted from the atmosphere, water, and nutrients/vitamins. The Finnish company responsible, Solar Foods, is hoping that food derived directly from carbon dioxide and sunlight can be a force in the growing movement to disrupt traditional food industries. [WORLD ECONOMIC FORUM]

PROGRESS

We Need A New Science of Progress

“Progress” is the combination of economic, technological, scientific, cultural, and organizational advancement that has transformed our lives and raised standards of living over the last several centuries. Is progress itself understudied? Does it need its own discipline? Here are the arguments. [ATLANTIC]

TECHNOLOGY

Scientist are Using the Cold of Outer Space to Rethink Air Conditioning

Using the centuries-old concept of radiative cooling, SkyCool Systems has developed a new material that reflects the light and heat of the sun so well that it can lower temperatures beneath the film by 5°-10° C as compared to the air around it. Radiative technologies could be leading us toward a revolution in low-energy cooling systems if we can overcome obvious implementation obstacles. [QUARTZ]

CARTOGRAPHY

Finally, A World Map That Doesn’t Lie

Traditional flat maps of the world based on the Mercator projection hideously distort land-masses and and create widespread misconceptions about the Earth. In 2016, Tokyo-based architect and artist Hajime Narukawa attacked this problem with a complicated, multistep process and created the most accurate 2D depiction of the globe to date. We couldn’t find a high-resolution version of the map online, so we made one that you can find here. [DISCOVER MAG]

Read More