Monthly Archives October 2019

In the course of our research for clients, we come across emerging technologies, new materials, new chemistries, growing markets, changing regulatory landscapes, innovative business models, and much more. Every other Friday, we pick five articles, videos, or podcasts that we found interesting and send them your way.

ASTRONOMY

Is “Planet 9” Actually a Primordial Black Hole?

Astronomers are on the trail of something big. Their target is between 5 and 15 times the mass of Earth and orbits the sun beyond Neptune. This is Planet 9, the last undiscovered orbiting body in the solar system, and a new theory about why we’ve never seen it is gaining traction: it may be a tennis-ball-sized black hole. [MIT TECH REVIEW]

MATERIALS | REFRIGERATION

Refrigerators of the Future May Be Inspired by the Weird Physics of Rubber

A new refrigeration technique harnesses the ability of rubber and other materials to cool down when released from a tight twist. The team has already applied the technique to cool a stream of water by 7.7° C in a single, 30-second cycle. The technology is in its infancy, but the discovery could someday provide an alternative to traditional cooling systems which account for about 20% of global electricity consumption. [NOVA]

STRATEGY

Hey CEOs, Have You Hugged the Uncertainty Monster Lately?

Terrible headline, but interesting article. You’ll miss a lot if you spend all your time focusing on the unknown. Learn to embrace it, however, and you can turn it into a competitive advantage. [WSJ]

INNOVATION

Validate the Business Model Before Building It

The worst way to validate a business model is buy building it: all the learning happens after you spent the money. Instead of making this expensive mistake, try something new: prototype your business model. [SHIPULSKI]

EVOLUTION

What Whales and Dolphins Left Behind for Life in the Ocean

Genes that are not being used are usually inactivated or simply disappear. A new study has pinpointed 85 of these genes, including blood coagulation, hair growth, and melatonin that were purged as cetacean ancestors moved from land into the sea, eventually becoming modern day whales, dolphins, and porpoises. [NYT]

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In the course of our research for clients, we come across emerging technologies, new materials, new chemistries, growing markets, changing regulatory landscapes, innovative business models, and much more. Every other Friday, we pick five articles, videos, or podcasts that we found interesting and send them your way.

THERMODYNAMICS | ENERGY

A New Way to Turn Heat Into Useful Energy

A discovery published last month in the journal Science Advances could lead to more efficient thermal energy harvesting. The effect—which researchers call paramagnon drag thermopower—is a local thermal perturbation of spins in a solid that can convert heat to energy even in a paramagnetic material, a place where spins weren’t thought to correlate long enough to do so. [NEW ENERGY AND FUEL]

BIOLOGY

First Hint That Body’s ‘Biological Age’ Can Be Reversed

Taking a cocktail of two diabetes medications and a growth hormone over the course of a year, nine healthy volunteers’ immune systems showed signs of rejuvenation and shed, on average, 2.5 years from their biological ages. Described as “surprising” and “futuristic” these results will need to be replicated in larger and better controlled trials in order to have an impact on disease and anti-aging treatments. [NATURE]

FUTURE OF WORK | TECHNOLOGY

The Work of the Future: Shaping Technology and Institutions

Robots are taking our jobs. AI will mean the end of work. Three-fourths of all jobs will be automated. The rhetoric may be alarmist, but it arises from genuine concerns. MIT recently created the Task Force on the Work of the Future to identify an evidence-based path forward. This is its first report, and its aim is to provide preliminary insights to help frame the public debate and public policy. [MIT]

STRATEGY | ECOSYSTEM

Here’s What You Need to Know to Compete in an Ecosystem-Driven World

We tend to think about business as hierarchy-driven, and you win by climbing your way to the top of the stack. In reality, however, the impact of a good idea is seldom felt until an ecosystem develops to support it: cars couldn’t take off until we build roads, and the productivity impact of PCs wasn’t revolutionary until software and the internet matured. In an ecosystem-driven world, power emanates from the center of networks. How do you make your way there? [DIGITAL TONTO]

MARINE BIOLOGY | VIDEO

Watch an Octopus Dream

A marine biologist captured incredible footage of a dreaming octopus rapidly changing color. [PBS]

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