Category Electric Vehicles

In the course of our research for clients, we come across emerging technologies, new materials, new chemistries, growing markets, changing regulatory landscapes, innovative business models, and much more. Every other Friday, we pick five articles, videos, or podcasts that we found interesting and send them your way.

MATERIALS SCIENCE

Perovskites: Moving from Solar Cells to X-ray Sensors to LEDs

Their ability to absorb light makes perovskites, a compound matching the structure of naturally-occurring perovskite, an excellent material for solar cells. But they’re also being explored as X-ray sensors and may become the next-generation material of choice for LED displays. [HACKADAY | SCIENCE MAG]

PHYSIOLOGY

Mobile Device Usage May be Changing Our Bodies

Examining X-ray images of Australians between the ages of 18 and 30, scientists have noticed an uptick in the number of people with bony growths at the base of their skulls. They believe these growths may be the result of our bodies compensating for poor posture caused by constantly looking down at hand-held mobile devices. [SCIENCE ALERT]

LEADERSHIP

What Silicon Valley Can Learn From Bill Walsh’s The Score Takes Care of Itself

In a review of the late Bill Walsh’s book, The Score Takes Care of Itself, Notejoy CEO Sachin Rekhi highlights the leadership philosophy of the former (great) San Francisco 49ers head coach. A key element of success for any team: focusing on process instead of outcome. [SACHIN REKHI]

ELECTRIC VEHICLES | AVIATION | VIDEO

Eviation Unveils Electric Airplane

The world’s first all-electric commercial aircraft was unveiled by startup Eviation at the International Paris Air Show last week. The nine-passenger plane is designed to serve short regional routes, will be able to fly 650 miles on a charge, and is set to begin testing soon in central Washington state. Massachusetts-based Cape Air is the first customer for the new craft and expects to begin flying it in 2022. You can find a video walk-through of the plane here. [GEEK WIRE | TPG]

SCIENCE

These are the Countries that Trust Scientist the Most—and the Least

An interesting look at a first-of-its-kind study surveying the thoughts and feelings about science and health of people around the world. Findings show that attitudes vary by gender, nationality, education, and income. And that people in the United State overestimate their understanding of science more than in any other country. [SCIENCE MAG]

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In the course of our research for clients, we come across emerging technologies, new materials, new chemistries, growing markets, changing regulatory landscapes, innovative business models, and much more. Every other Friday, we pick five articles, videos, or podcasts that we found interesting and send them your way.

POLYMERS | MATERIAL SCIENCE

A New Spring for Polymers in Japan

Supported by government funding, researchers in Japan have invented an array of novel polymers. One such material is a new type of aerogel called superfunctional air, or Sufa. Made of up to 98% air, it has superb insulation properties and transparency similar to glass, making it excellent for use in windows. And unlike other aerogels, it is softer, retains its shape after being pressed, and dries on its own, dramatically driving down production costs. [C&EN]

BATTERIES | ELECTRIC VEHICLES

Electric Car Battery with 600 Miles of Range? This Startup Claims to Have Done It

Innolith, a Swiss startup, claims to have made the world’s first 1,000 Wh/kg rechargeable lithium battery. With most electric car batteries topping out at about 250 Wh/kg, it sounds like a specious claim. But Innolith says the difference lies in the technology: they use an inorganic, salt-like material instead of the highly flammable organic solvent traditionally used in “wet” lithium-ion batteries. Plans are to launch a pilot program in Germany, and have the batteries ready for market by 2022. [VERGE]

MANAGEMENT | PSYCHOLOGY

Maslow Didn’t Make the Pyramid that Changed Management History

According to a new study by three management professors, the ubiquitous Maslow’s Pyramid infographic was not designed by the psychologist, but by a management consultant inspired by a theorist’s flawed interpretation of Maslow’s ideas (which many believe to be flawed themselves). When the oversimplified interpretation was applied to business management, it took on a life of its own. [QUARTZ]

ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE

Teaching Machines to Reason About What They See

Researchers want computers to reason more like humans. To accomplish this, they are merging statistical with symbolic programming. Popular in the mid-twentieth century, symbolic AI uses less data and inputs, instead relying on rules and logic to help machines connect images with words and make comparisons, much like a young child would. Studies led by the MIT-IBM research team are showing promising results. [MIT]

PHYSICS | VIDEO

Video: Phase-Changing Material Keeps Ice at Bay

Accumulation of ice on wind turbines or power lines can be damaging and dangerous. This short video details how dimethyl sulfoxide, which freezes at a higher temperature than water, is employed to keep ice from forming on surfaces. [C&EN]

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In the course of our research for clients, we come across emerging technologies, new materials, new chemistries, growing markets, changing regulatory landscapes, innovative business models, and much more. Every other Friday, we pick five articles, videos, or podcasts that we found interesting and send them your way.

LEADERSHIP | MANAGEMENT | BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE

The Surprising Power of Questions

Questioning is a uniquely powerful tool for unlocking value in organizations: It spurs learning and the exchange of ideas, it fuels innovation and performance improvement, it builds rapport and trust among team members. This article draws on insights from behavioral science research to explore how the way we frame questions and choose to answer our counterparts can influence the outcome of conversations. [HBR]

MATERIALS | SEMICONDUCTORS

Heat-Conducting Crystals Could Help Computer Chips Keep Their Cool

As consumers demand smaller, faster and more powerful electronic devices that draw more current and generate more heat, the issue of heat management is reaching a bottleneck. Researchers at UT Dallas and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have created a potential solution: crystals of a semiconducting material called boron arsenide that have a thermal conductivity of 1000 watts per meter-kelvin, second only to diamonds. Boron arsenide’s semiconducting properties are very comparable to silicon. [SCIENCE DAILY]

HUMAN EVOLUTION | ANTHROPOLOGY

A Group of People with an Amphibious Life Have Evolved Traits to Match

A group of people in the Malay Archipelago, the Bajau, spend the majority of their lives at sea, and historical evidence suggest they have been living this way for at least 1,000 years. Unsurprisingly, their diving abilities are prodigious: they sometimes descend more than 70 meters and can stay submerged for up to five minutes. By studying DNA samples from the Bajau and comparing it to the DNA of closely-related, land-living neighbors, scientists have uncovered natural selection at work on modern humans. [THE ECONOMIST]

ELECTRIC VEHICLES | TRANSPORTATION

Sweden Builds First Ever Electrified Road for Charging Vehicles as They Drive

Around 1.2 miles of electric rail has been built into a public road just outside Stockholm, and plans are in place to expand the project throughout other parts of the country and the world. The electrified road works by transferring energy from the rail through a moveable arm on the bottom of an electric car or truck. Those behind the initiative estimate that only the major routes – around 3 per cent of the total road network – would need to be modified to considerably cut carbon emissions. [INDEPENDENT]

ENVIRONMENT | INFOGRAPHIC

7 Striking Maps that Visualize the Human Footprint

Humans have changed the face of the planet. Our impact has been so profound, in fact, that many have declared the dawn of the Anthropocene epoch, or the age of human influence, a term that is not without controversy as can be seen here or—hilariously—here. This ambitious graphic from Reldresal looks at the human footprint from a number of different angles, some expected and others creative. [VISUAL CAPITALIST | BBC | REDDIT | WINNER]

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