Category Health

In the course of our research for clients, we come across emerging technologies, new materials, new chemistries, growing markets, changing regulatory landscapes, innovative business models, and much more. Every other Friday, we pick five articles, videos, or podcasts that we found interesting and send them your way.

MEDICINE

Molecular Drills Tear into Superbugs’ Antibiotic Defenses

Bacteria are quickly evolving resistance to our best drugs, threatening to make the most mundane infections lethal once again. Now, researchers at Rice University have developed a new method to kill these emerging superbugs, using molecular “drills” to pierce their cell walls. The same technique has also been shown to work on cancer cells. [NEW ATLAS]

ENERGY | AUDIO

How Much the U.S. Relies on Oil From the Middle East

Helima Croft, managing director and global head of commodity strategy at RBC Capital Markets, delivers an incredibly tight summary on why the U.S. remains dependent on Middle East oil despite being the top producer of oil and natural gas in the world. [NPR]

LEADERSHIP

13 Things Mentally Strong People Don’t Do

Want to become mentally tougher? Here’s a list of things that people with the critical hallmarks of mental strength don’t do. [LIFEHACK]

HEALTH

98.6 Degrees Fahrenheit Isn’t the Average Anymore

Nearly 150 years ago, a German physician analyzed a million temperatures from 25,000 patients and concluded that normal human-body temperature is 98.6 degrees Fahrenheit. But at least two dozen modern studies have concluded the number is too high. [WSJ]

NATURE

A Zoo’s Jungle Cats Would Like Your Leftover Perfume, Preferably Calvin Klein

Large jungle cats have expensive taste: they are . . . well . . . obsessed with Calvin Klein’s Obsession for Men. The ingredient they find irresistable is civetone, a lab-made copy of the pheromones of the civet, a cat-like mammal found in Africa and Southeast Asia. The scent is used by researchers to attract animals in the wild and used like catnip by zookeepers to keep the animals from getting bored. [WASHINGTON POST]

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In the course of our research for clients, we come across emerging technologies, new materials, new chemistries, growing markets, changing regulatory landscapes, innovative business models, and much more. Every other Friday, we pick five articles, videos, or podcasts that we found interesting and send them your way.

PHYSICS

The X17 Particle: Scientists May Have Discovered the Fifth Force of Nature

Physicists have long known of four fundamental forces of nature: gravity, electromagnetism, the strong nuclear force, and the weak nuclear force. Now evidence is growing for a fifth. Building on experimentally-reproduced work from 2016, a team at Hungary’s Institute for Nuclear Research observed the X17 particle—a “protophobic X boson”—being emitted from the decay of a helium isotope rather than the original experiment’s beryllium-8. If confirmed, the existence of a fifth force would completely change our understanding of the universe. [BIG THINK]

HEALTH

Humans Placed in Suspended Animation for the First Time

As part of a trial at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, doctors are using a technique in which a patient suffering from acute trauma is rapidly cooled to the point where all heart and brain function is stopped. They are, essentially, dead. The surgical team then has two hours to operate before the patient is warmed and their heart restarted. [NEW SCIENTIST]

INNOVATION

Why Constraints Are Good for Innovation

After reviewing 145 empirical studies, the authors conclude that innovation thrives when individuals, teams, and organizations are working with a healthy dose of constraints. But striking the right balance is hard, and they suggest guidelines for picking the constraints that will foster innovation rather than creating frustration and suppressing creativity. [HBR]

ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE

The Blogger Behind “AI Weirdness” Thinks Today’s AI is Dumb and Dangerous

In her recently released book You Look Like A Thing and I Love You, blogger Janelle Shane discusses and highlights the absurdly funny—but also quite serious—limitations of today’s AI. [IEEE SPECTRUM]

LIFE

The Saga of The Cannibal Ants in a Soviet Nuclear Bunker

This is the weird, but true, story of an extraordinarily resilient group of ants, who after falling into the darkness of an underground bunker, resorted to cannibalism to stay alive. It has a happy ending. [ATLAS OBSCURA]

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In the course of our research for clients, we come across emerging technologies, new materials, new chemistries, growing markets, changing regulatory landscapes, innovative business models, and much more. Every other Friday, we pick five articles, videos, or podcasts that we found interesting and send them your way.

MATERIALS | VIDEO

This Improbable Membrane Could Block Germs While Allowing Surgeons to Operate Through It

In what might seem like science fiction, a team of researchers has engineered a reverse filter: it traps small particles and lets large ones through. The filter, held together by surface tension, is a transparent liquid membrane. Instead of sorting particles by size, it sorts them by kinetic energy—larger objects with more force break through, but lighter, slower objects do not. Once broken, the puncture self-heals instantaneously. [SCIENCE]

FINANCE | PODCAST

Should Companies Abandon Quarterly Earnings Reports?

In a tweet on Aug. 17, U.S. President Donald Trump announced that he has asked the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) to study whether it makes sense for publicly held companies to publish half-yearly earnings reports instead of the current quarterly mode. Many have argued that such a switch would help companies take a longer term view of the future to the benefit of both employees and investors. But watchdog groups and regulatory bodies worry that reduced oversight will lead to bad outcomes. This relatively short podcast (and comprehensive accompanying article) does a good job fleshing out the arguments on both sides of the issue. [WHARTON]

HEALTH | BIOLOGY

Gut Bug Enzyme Turns Any Blood into Type-O

By utilizing a promising new discovery, enzymes from gut bacteria, researchers believe they have found a reliable way to transform the different blood types into the universally accepted type-O. The future of blood donations could change for the better, if the next stage of clinical trials yields positive results. [BBC]

AUTONOMOUS VEHICLES | NETWORKING

Autonomous Vehicles in 2025: Network Cost Outstrips AI Computing Cost

When they consider the cost of ADAS/AV (autonomous vehicles), many observers assume that the computing power required for AI processing is going to be the costliest element.“Not so,” according to Alexander E. Tan, vice president and general manager of Automotive Ethernet Solutions at NXP. He predicts that in 2025 in-vehicle networking will cost more than computing. [EETIMES]

SCIENCE AWARDS

Here Are Your 2018 Ig Nobel Prize Winners

Ever wondered if saliva is actually a good cleaning agent, or how good chimpanzees are at imitating humans? Or whether stabbing a voodoo doll representing your horrible boss could help reduce workplace tension? The winners of this year’s Ig Nobel Prizes have got you covered. Established in 1991, the Ig Nobels are a good-natured parody of the Nobel Prizes, honoring “achievements that first make people laugh, and then make them think.” [ARS TECHNICA]

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