Category Aviation

In the course of our research for clients, we come across emerging technologies, new materials, new chemistries, growing markets, changing regulatory landscapes, innovative business models, and much more. Every other Friday, we pick five articles, videos, or podcasts that we found interesting and send them your way.

PRIVACY | TECHNOLOGY

Activate This ‘Bracelet of Silence’ and Alexa Can’t Eavesdrop

Growing privacy concerns and the lack of control over data captured by smart devices has prompted a surge in new products designed to help consumers opt-out of surveillance. Among them is a wrist-worn device that jams nearby microphones. [NYT]

AVIATION

No One Can Explain Why Planes Stay In The Air

Flying is an amazing example of human ingenuity. But providing an explanation for how exactly planes are able to stay in the air is a much more difficult feat. The two prevailing theories, developed by scientists whose work long predates air travel, attempt to explain lift but neither gives a complete account of the scientific process. [SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN]

LEADERSHIP

Don’t Demonize Employees Who Raise Problems

Problem spotters don’t especially enjoy bearing bad news, but they do it to advance the organization and help you, the leader. Maybe it’s because they have a different perspective. Maybe it’s that they are better at expressing the issue, where others struggle. Stop making it so hard on them to help you. [HBR]

BIOLOGY | ASTRONOMY

What Does It Means for a Planet to be “Habitable”

For many years scientists believed a planet needed two things to support life: a rocky surface and liquid surface water. Now the general consensus is . . . that there is no general consensus. [MIT TECH REVIEW]

EXISTENTIAL THREATS | PODCAST

The Bomb

Fred Kaplan is the author of the new book The Bomb: Presidents, Generals, and the Secret History of Nuclear War. In this in-depth discussion between Sam Harris and Mr. Kaplan, they cover the history of nuclear deterrence, nuclear politics, U.S. first-strike policy, preventive war, limited nuclear war, and the details of nuclear weapon command and control. Although terrifying, all of it is worth your time. [MAKING SENSE PODCAST]

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In the course of our research for clients, we come across emerging technologies, new materials, new chemistries, growing markets, changing regulatory landscapes, innovative business models, and much more. Every other Friday, we pick five articles, videos, or podcasts that we found interesting and send them your way.

MATERIALS SCIENCE

Perovskites: Moving from Solar Cells to X-ray Sensors to LEDs

Their ability to absorb light makes perovskites, a compound matching the structure of naturally-occurring perovskite, an excellent material for solar cells. But they’re also being explored as X-ray sensors and may become the next-generation material of choice for LED displays. [HACKADAY | SCIENCE MAG]

PHYSIOLOGY

Mobile Device Usage May be Changing Our Bodies

Examining X-ray images of Australians between the ages of 18 and 30, scientists have noticed an uptick in the number of people with bony growths at the base of their skulls. They believe these growths may be the result of our bodies compensating for poor posture caused by constantly looking down at hand-held mobile devices. [SCIENCE ALERT]

LEADERSHIP

What Silicon Valley Can Learn From Bill Walsh’s The Score Takes Care of Itself

In a review of the late Bill Walsh’s book, The Score Takes Care of Itself, Notejoy CEO Sachin Rekhi highlights the leadership philosophy of the former (great) San Francisco 49ers head coach. A key element of success for any team: focusing on process instead of outcome. [SACHIN REKHI]

ELECTRIC VEHICLES | AVIATION | VIDEO

Eviation Unveils Electric Airplane

The world’s first all-electric commercial aircraft was unveiled by startup Eviation at the International Paris Air Show last week. The nine-passenger plane is designed to serve short regional routes, will be able to fly 650 miles on a charge, and is set to begin testing soon in central Washington state. Massachusetts-based Cape Air is the first customer for the new craft and expects to begin flying it in 2022. You can find a video walk-through of the plane here. [GEEK WIRE | TPG]

SCIENCE

These are the Countries that Trust Scientist the Most—and the Least

An interesting look at a first-of-its-kind study surveying the thoughts and feelings about science and health of people around the world. Findings show that attitudes vary by gender, nationality, education, and income. And that people in the United State overestimate their understanding of science more than in any other country. [SCIENCE MAG]

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